Tweeting Out Falsehoods Isn’t OK Just Because It Makes Trump Look Bad – The Young Turks

One of the features of the emerging “Trump era” is that basically anyone can tweet out something incendiary about Trump, no matter how factually dubious, and be reasonably sure that it’ll garner vast amounts of likes and retweets. Here’s the latest whopper, from Andrea Stone, a veteran journalist who is now director of Career Services at CUNY Journalism School.

The Young Turks observe:

One of the features of the emerging “Trump era” is that basically anyone can tweet out something incendiary about Trump, no matter how factually dubious, and be reasonably sure that it’ll garner vast amounts of likes and retweets.

Here’s the tweet in question, by Andrea Stone, a journalist who is now director of Career Services at CUNY Journalism School. It is untrue. Yet it was retweeted and ‘liked’ tens of thousands of times, before it was eventually deleted.

 

There’s so much bad to say about Trump. It is therefore easy, reflexively, to assume that any tweet or news item which shows him in a bad light is true. We tend not to check the facts if the source seems trustworthy.

But as the Young Turks note:

Maybe this seems petty. But if we’re going to counter disinformation in the “Trump era,” of which there will be much, we can’t overlook stuff like this. The result of Stone’s tweet is that tens of thousands (hundreds of thousands?) of people now believe false information. Journalists discredit themselves and cede discursive ground to Trump when they mindlessly propagate falsehoods.